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Climate Talk

showing 21-30 of 33 results

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Bio-energy and its Controversial Role in EU Climate Policy

TimeLoc
29 May 2008
Berlin
Germany
Speaker
In January 2008, the European Commission published ambitious targets with regard to the future share of biofuels in the transport sector. By 2020, 10% of the fuels used in transport shall be biofuels. Furthermore, in the climate policies of individual Member States, biofuels also play an important role. However, more and more critics argue against the use of bio-energy. Controversies emerge concerning the climate footprint of bio-energy and the effects of biomass use on biodiversity and food security. The Climate Talk convened experts who discussed potential strategies to address these problems.Read more

How Much Does Nuclear Energy Really Contribute to Climate Protection?

TimeLoc
11 March 2008
Berlin
Germany
Speaker
The debate regarding the expansion of nuclear energy capacity has gained new prominence in the face of climate change. In scientific and political scenarios, nuclear energy is often seen as an important element of a future energy system. Against this backdrop, the Climate Talk tried to evaluate the actual contribution of nuclear energy towards greenhouse gas reduction targets. Taking into account existing and emerging alternatives, the experts assessed the future role of nuclear energy in the international climate policy regime.Read more

Auctioning Emissions Credits – Silver Bullet or Abyss? Requirements and Options for Auction Design

TimeLoc
26 November 2007
Berlin
Germany
Speaker
When designing emissions trading schemes, the decision on allocation methods is a crucial element. After a long and controversial debate, the German government has now decided to introduce the auctioning of credits. Approximately nine percent of all allowances will be given out against payment in the second trading period (2008–2012). In 2008, rules for the German auctioning system are expected to be specified by a regulation. Environmental economists tend to support auctioning for reasons of efficiency while many politicians and the public mostly expect the reduction of unwanted distributional effects (“wind-fall-profits”).Read more

Evaluation of the German "Double-Presidency" through a Climate Protection Policy Lens

TimeLoc
28 July 2007
Berlin
Germany
Speaker
When designing emissions trading schemes, the decision on allocation methods is a crucial element. After a long and controversial debate, the German government has now decided to introduce the auctioning of credits. Approximately nine percent of all allowances will be given out against payment in the second trading period (2008–2012). In 2008, rules for the German auctioning system are expected to be specified by a regulation. Environmental economists tend to support auctioning for reasons of efficiency while many politicians and the public mostly expect the reduction of unwanted distributional effects (“wind-fall-profits”).Read more

The Different Paths to Climate Protection – Competitive or Complementary?

TimeLoc
7 September 2006
Berlin
Germany
Speaker
Climate change as a global phenomenon requires global action. The strategies of states are very multi-faceted and variable: next to the Kyoto Protocol (KP), which sets forth binding reduction targets, are a number of initiatives such as the Asian Pacific Partnership agreement for Clean Development and Climate (AP6) with a voluntary, technology-based approach, and the Action Program for climate protection put in place at the G8 Summit in Gleneagles. At the 9th climate talk it was debated whether these varied approaches are effective for climate protection, and to what extent they complement or compete and thus hinder one another.Read more

CO2 - Capture and Sequestration – A Political Chance for Coal as Climate Protection?

TimeLoc
24 May 2006
Berlin
Germany
Speaker
The main cause of global climate change is the burning of fossil fuels, especially coal. The future climate policy will encounter major challenges from an expected substantial buildup of coal-fired power plants, resulting from the security of supply and production cost reasons. Some experts hope for a clean solution to this problem by turning to Carbon Capture and Storage (CCS). The Climate Talk on 24 May 2006 focused on the questions, of whether climate policy can reconcile itself with coal-fired energy production by using CCS and what kind of problems and challenges can be expected from this new technology.Read more

The new National Allocation Plans (NAPs) – Lessons learned?

TimeLoc
11 April 2006
Berlin
Germany
Speaker
EU Member States have until the end of June 2006 to submit their National Allocation Plans (NAPs) to the European Commission. These plans are a decisive element of the preparation for the second phase (2008-2012) of EU Emissions Trading Scheme and thus a cornerstone of European climate policy. Currently, the Member States are hurriedly preparing their respective Plans. Again, as with the preparation of the first NAPs, some fundamental questions are raised, for example regarding allocation methods for emissions certificates, the emission caps, and the installations covered by the Scheme. But in contrast to 2004, when the NAPs for the first trading period (2005-2007) were drafted, this time the Member States can draw upon some experiences.Read more

The German Law on Project-Based Mechanisms – Potentials, Chances and Problems for Companies Participating in Emissions Trading

TimeLoc
12 December 2005
Berlin
Germany
Speaker
The newly introduced law on project-based mechanisms (ProMechG), which entered into force 30 September 2005, was the topic of the Climate Talk on 12 December 2005. At the event the new cooperation partner for the Climate Talk, the German Institute for Economic Research (DIW Berlin), was introduced. At DIW's offices in Berlin-Dahlem, the participants vividly discussed the ProMechG and its implications for businesses.Read more

The National Climate Protection Program – Consequences for Climate Policy, Emissions Trading and Sectors not covered in Emissions Trading

TimeLoc
13 August 2005
Berlin
Germany
Speaker
The new National Climate Protection Program, as agreed upon by the federal government on 13 July, was the subject of the "Climate Talk" on 13 August 2005. Experts from business, science and politics discussed the economic and political meaning of the program, particularly against the backdrop of emissions trading, Germany's (formerly) leading role in climate protection and Germany's 2012-emissions-reduction-goals. Presentations were given by Astrid Harnisch (Federal Ministry of the Environment, Nature Conservation and Nuclear Protection, BMU), Regine Günther (WWF) and Sven Reinhardt (CDU/CSU-faction).Read more

Kyoto Protocol Ratification – So what?

TimeLoc
10 March 2005
Berlin
Germany
Speaker
After years of political debate, the Kyoto Protocol came into force on 16 February 2005. Against this background, the fourth Climate Talk posed questions regarding what climate politics and economic effects the Kyoto Protocol in its present form will have and which (further) steps for the path to a "Carbon Constrained Economy" (Tony Blair) are necessary. Presentations were given by Dr. Hermann Ott (Head of the Wuppertal Institute Berlin Office) and by Dr. Hans-Joachim Ziesing (Senior Executive of the German Institute for Economic Research).Read more

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