• English
  • Deutsch
Facebook icon
LinkedIn icon
Twitter icon
YouTube icon
Header image Ecologic

Tradable Permits in Water Ressource Management and Water Pollution Control

Publication

Tradable Permits in Water Ressource Management and Water Pollution Control

Kraemer, R. Andreas; Kai M. Banholzer 1998: Tradable Permits in Water Ressource Management and Water Pollution Control. Ecologic – Center for International and European Environmental Research, Berlin.


Citation

Kraemer, R. Andreas; Kai M. Banholzer 1998: Tradable Permits in Water Ressource Management and Water Pollution Control. Ecologic – Center for International and European Environmental Research, Berlin.

Language
English
Author(s)
Kai M. Banholzer
Year
1998
Dimension
51 pp.
Project ID
972-98
Table of Contents

1. Introduction
1.1 Methodology
1.2 A Simple Typology of Cases
1.3 Structure of this Report
2. Policy Background to Tradable Permits
2.1 Australia
2.2 United States
2.3 Chile
2.4 European Union
3. Tradable Water Abstraction Rights
3.1 Trading of Water Abstraction Rights in the US
3.1.1 Idaho Water Supply Bank on the Upper Snake River
3.1.2 Northern Colorado Water Conservancy District
3.1.3 California Water Bank: From Emergency Water Trading
3.1.4 ... to Permanent Water Trading through "Water Links" in California
3.1.5 Water Trading Along the Rio Grande and the West Texas Plains
3.2 Australia: Policy Learning in Nested Institutions?
3.2.1 Inter-State Water Trading: Murray-Darling Basin Commission
3.2.2 Irrigation Water Trading: Gouldburn-Murray Region, Victoria
3.2.3 Irrigation Water Trading: Murrumbidgee, Murray-Darling Basin, NSW
3.2.4 Irrigation Water Trading: New South Wales Murray Region
3.3 Chile: Effects of Radical Innovation
3.3.1 The Maipo Valley (upstream), Chile
3.3.2 The Limari Valley, Chile
3.4 Equivalent Instruments to Tradable Water Abstraction Rights
3.4.1 General Remarks on Instruments Equivalent to Tradable Rights
3.4.2 Water Tax Case: Hamburg, Germany
3.5 Summary Remarks on Tradable Water Abstraction Rights
4. Tradable Water Pollution Rights
4.1 Salinity Trading
4.1.1 Introduction to Salinity Trading
4.1.2 Inter-State Salinity Trading Case: Murray-Darling Basin, Australia
4.1.3 Salt Pollution Trading Case: Hunter River, NSW, Australia
4.1.4 Buying Off Salt Pollution Rights in the River Weser, Germany
4.1.5 Summary Remarks on Salinity Trading
4.2 Trading of Organic Pollution Rights
4.2.1 General Remarks on Water Pollution with Organic Substances
4.2.2 Organic Point Source Trading Case: Fox River, Wisconsin, United States
4.3 Trading of Nutrient Pollution Rights
4.3.1 Nutrients Trading Case: Hawkesbury-Nepean River, NSW, Australia
4.3.2 Nutrient Trading: Tar-Pamlico River, North Carolina, United States
4.3.3 Point/Non-Point Nutrient Trading: Lake Dillon, Colorado, United States
4.3.4 Nutrient trading Cherry Creek, Colorado, United States
4.3.5 Summary Remarks on Nutrient Trading
4.4 Equivalent Instruments to Tradable Water Pollution Rights
4.4.1 Quality Objectives as Traditional 'Bubbles'
4.4.2 Quality Objectives for Pentachlorophenol: Irwell Basin, England, UK
4.5 Summary Remarks on Tradable Water Pollution Rights
5. Tradable Rights to Water-Based Resources
5.1 Examples of Trading in Water-Based Resources
5.1.1 Freshwater Fisheries: Fishing rights in Scotland, UK
5.1.2 One-off Trade in Hydro Power and Irrigation: Maule River Basin, Chile
5.1.3 Water Management Associations for Managing Multiple Water Use, Germany
5.1.4 Resource Allocation for Multiple-Use: Wasserverband Westdeutsche Kanäle
5.2 Summary Remarks on Tradable Rights to Water-Based Resources
6. Broader than Markets? - Common Property Regimes
6.1 The Empirical Basis
6.2 Design Principles for Common Property Regimes
6.3 Applicability
7. Discussion and Conclusion
7.1 Opportunities and Limitations
7.2 Strategies for Introducing Tradable Permit Regimes in Water Management
7.3 Compatibility of Tradable Permit Regimes in Instrument Mixes
7.3.1 Compatibility with Taxes and Charges
7.3.2 Compatibility with Environmental Quality Objectives
7.3.3 Compatibility with Technology-Derived Standards (BAT)
7.3.4 Compatibility with Established Principles of Environmental Policy
7.3.5 Tradable Permit Systems within Instrument Mixes
7.4 Overall Assessment
References