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Effectiveness of Current Policy Frameworks in Mitigating Climate-induced Risks

Effectiveness of Current Policy Frameworks in Mitigating Climate-induced Risks

Relating to Human Security and Conflict (Ethiopia)
Case Study on Ethiopia

This case study for Ethiopia is a contribution to the study "Current policy frameworks for addressing climate-induced risks to human security and conflict – an assessment of their effectiveness and future perspectives". The case study [pdf, 783 KB, English] is available for download.


Citation

Vidaurre, Rodrigo and Elizabeth Tedsen 2012: Effectiveness of current policy frameworks in mitigating climate-induced risks relating to human security and conflict – case study on Ethiopia. Ecologic Institute, Berlin.

Language
English
Year
2012
Dimension
34 pp.
Project ID
2703
Table of Contents

1. Introduction
2. Background
2.1 Country Background Ethiopia
2.2 Water-related impacts of climate change
2.2.1 Physical impacts
2.2.2 Human security impacts
2.2.3 Impacts on conflict
2.3 Awareness of climate change
3. Policy Framework on Water and Climate Change
3.1 Overview
3.1.1 Water policy
3.1.2 Agriculture and Development Policy
3.1.3 Land rights and resources use rights policy
3.1.4 Disaster preparedness and response and food security policy
3.1.5 Environmental policy
3.1.6 Other policies
3.2 Interviewees’ evaluation of policy framework
3.2.1 General evaluation
3.2.2 Agriculture and Development
3.2.3 Disaster preparedness and response and food security policy
3.2.4 Environmental policy
3.2.5 Water policy
3.3 Stakeholder expectations and demands concerning future policy
3.3.1 Expectations regarding the national level
3.3.2 Expectations for international level
4. Evaluation of results
4.1 Insights on climate change, water, and human security
4.2 Insights on climate change and water-related conflicts
4.3 Insights on the current national policy framework
4.4 Insights on a future policy framework
References
Interviewees

Keywords
Conflict, Water, Climate, Ethiopia