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Arctic

showing 81-90 of 103 results

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Newly identified: 77 Ecologically or Biologically Significant Areas in the Arctic marine environment

June 2009 to June 2011

New maps identifying 77 Areas of Ecologically or Biologically Significance (EBSAs) in the Arctic marine environment are now available through a recent project led by International Union for Conservation of Nature (IUCN), Natural Resources Defense Council (NRDC), Scripps Institution of Oceanography and Ecologic Institute. The report identifies 13 "Super EBSAs" which are of key importance because they meet many or all criteria developed under the Convention on Biological Diversity (CBD).The report is available for download.Read more

Geoengineering and the Governance of International Spaces

TimeLoc
22 April 2009
Washington, DC
United States
Speaker

There is growing interest in the idea of geoengineering, the purposeful and large-scale modification of the natural environment, especially since the article in Foreign Affairs "The Geoengineering Option" by David Victor and others. Jointly with the Foundation for the Good Governance of International Spaces, Ecologic Institute held this Transatlantic Luncheon in Washington DC on 22 April 2009. Guests of honour were Paul Berkman, Scott Polar Institute, University of Cambridge, and Ralph Czarnecki, Ecologic Institute.

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Changing Arctic: Changing Planet

TimeLoc
28 March 2009
Aspen, CO
During the 2009 Aspen Environment Forum, the conversation addressed the changing Arctic in discussion with Sven Lindblad of Lindblad Expeditions, NOAA Administrator Jane Lubchenco, Climate Communications Director Susan Joy Hassol, Oceanographer Sylvia Earle, author Charles Wohlforth, Elizabeth Cheney of Shell Oil, Ecologic Institute Director R. Andreas Kraemer, and University of Alaska Chancellor Fran Ulmer. Aspen Institute's Executive Director of the Energy and Environment Program, David Monsma, moderatedRead more

Protecting the Arctic marine environment in a changing climate – options for transatlantic and international governance

TimeLoc
12 March 2009
Copenhagen
Denmark
At the International Scientific Congress “Climate Change: Global Risks, Challenges & Decisions”, experts presented a summary of scientific findings since the 2007 Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) Assessment. The congress attracted broad international attention in the run-up to the United Nations Climate Change Conference (COP-15) in Copenhagen in December 2009. In the session entitled “Integrating Climate Change into Global Sustainability”, Sandra Cavalieri presented transatlantic and international policy options to protect the Arctic marine environment that had emerged from the Arctic TRANSFORM project.Read more

Arctic at Stake – Experts Call for Improvements in Governing Climate-change Adaptation

TimeLoc
5 March 2009
Brussels
Belgium

EU Commissioner Benita Ferrero-Waldner and Diana Wallis, Member of European Parliament welcomed more than 120 experts from government and civil society worldwide to discuss "Transatlantic Policy Options for the Marine Arctic" at a conference in Brussels on 5 March 2009. High-level speakers from Europe and the U.S. presented their preferred policy options for addressing climate change in the Arctic with...Read more

Transatlantic Policy Options for Supporting Adaptation in the Marine Arctic

The Arctic TRANSFORM project, funded by the European Commission‘s Directorate General of External Relations, engaged experts in a transatlantic discussion of five Arctic-related thematic areas: indigenous peoples, environmental governance, fisheries, offshore hydrocarbon activities, and shipping. Expert working groups addressed each thematic area with the goal of developing policy options for the Arctic marine area. This policy brief draws upon a series of background papers, expert meetings and interviews to provide an overview of the international and EU governance options for addressing the rapid changes underway in the region.Read more

Arctic Shipping

Current Arctic marine shipping is mainly intra-Arctic. Since 2000, there have only been a small number of trans-Arctic voyages in summer for science and tourism across the Northwest Passage and the Northern Sea Route. The main consequence of climate change for Arctic marine shipping is contained in the Arctic Climate Impact Assessment (ACIA)’s key finding that “reduced sea ice is very likely to increase marine transport and access to resources”. This background paper, prepared by Erik J. Molenaar and Robert Corell for the Arctic TRANSFORM project, focuses on intra-Arctic and trans-Arctic marine shipping in the Arctic marine area.Read more

Arctic Fisheries

This background paper, prepared by Erik J. Molenaar and Robert Corell for the Arctic TRANSFORM project, focuses on fisheries that occur in the Arctic marine area, including fisheries for anadromous species that spawn in rivers that flow directly into the Arctic marine area. The paper follows a sectoral perspective, but in pursuance of an ecosystem approach to fisheries (EAF). Due to this sectoral perspective, the focus will be exclusively on international instruments and intergovernmental and other relevant international bodies that relate to, or pursue, conservation as well as management. No attention will therefore be paid to those that focus exclusively on conservation of species and habitat by various means, including by the regulation of international trade.Read more

Comparative Policy Analysis

US, EU and Transatlantic Arctic Policy
This policy analysis, prepared for the Arctic TRANSFORM project, provides a comparative analysis of EU and U.S. policy relevant to dealing with the effects of climate change in Arctic marine areas. Arctic marine governance at present is a patchwork of rules, measures and polices at various levels and institutions. A key question is how better co-ordination among the current sectoral and regional approaches can be achieved to address future governance needs. A second question is whether even better co-ordination among these approaches will suffice to meet these needs, or whether a more comprehensive approach is required. Addressing the unique challenges facing the marine Arctic could be an opportunity for both the EU and U.S. to revitalise their co-operation and show combined environmental leadership.Read more

Learning from Europe's Mistakes

Can the US catch up in climate protection?
"A New Transatlantic Partnership" is the theme of the first issue in 2009 of the Global Edition of the journal "Internationale Politik" (IP Global Edition), published by the German Council on Foreign Relations (DGAP). R. Andreas Kraemer contributed a preview of the possibilities for future cooperation between the US and Europe both on climate and energy policy for jointly meeting the transformational challenges ahead and on the Arctic, where the future of international relations may well be decided.Read more

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