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Biodiversity

showing 381-390 of 466 results

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Mountain Sustainability: Transforming Research into Practice (mountain.TRIP)

December 2009 to November 2011
Global change holds many risks for European mountain regions. Melting glaciers, changes in permafrost and vegetation, as well as political, economic and cultural globalisation present dangers for mountain populations. Numerous research projects have produced valuable findings to ensure sustainable development in European mountain regions. Mountain.TRIP starts where these projects stop: translating research findings into useful information for practitioners.Read more
Presentation

The Cost of Policy Inaction (COPI) on Biodiversity

TimeLoc
5 November 2009
Frankfurt am Main
Germany

On 5 November 2009, the Biodiversity and Climate Research Centre (BiK-F) in Frankfurt/Main hosted a workshop focusing on “Opportunities and limits of the ecosystem services concept.” Holger Gerdes, Fellow at the Ecologic Institute, gave a presentation on the application of the ecosystem services concept in policy consultancy.

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Biodiversity of Freshwater Ecosystems: Status, Trends, Pressures, and Conservation Priorities (BioFresh)

November 2009 to April 2014

Freshwater biodiversity patterns and the processes that maintain them at European and global scale are poorly understood for most freshwater organisms. The BioFresh FP7 project built a public biodiversity information platform to bring together the vast amount of information on freshwater biodiversity currently scattered among a wide range of databases. This portal allows scientists and planners to evaluate and examine how freshwater biodiversity responds to environmental pressures for more effective conservation planning.

Background

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RADOST – Regional Kick-off Conference

TimeLoc
6 October 2009
Rostock - Warnemünde
Germany
In the context of the conference "Coastal Management & Climate Change: Status Quo" on 5 and 6 October 2009 in Rostock – Warnemünde the RADOST project (Regional Adaptation Strategies for the German Baltic Sea Coast) celebrated its regional kick-off.Read more

Keeping Illegal Fish and Timber off the Market

A Comparison of EU Regulations
Illegal fishing and logging, and the international trade in illegally sourced fish and wood products cause enormous environmental and economic damage. Consumer countries contribute to the problem by importing fish and timber without ensuring legality – a problem the EU tries to address with two new regulations. In this briefing paper, Duncan Brack, Heike Baumüller and Katharina Umpfenbach compare the recently adopted EU regulations on illegal fish and timber products. The authors contrast the very different approaches and highlight areas that might need further strengthening.Read more

Die Biomassestrom-Nachhaltigkeitsverordnung (BioSt-NachV)

Eine kurze Einführung für AnlagenbetreiberInnen
Sustainability of biofuel policies is a largely debated issue, particularly with regards to environmental impacts. To address these issues, European and national legislative initiatives have been designed that aim to ensure the sustainability of biofuels. Germany has been among the top runners in trying to implement sustainability criteria for biofuels. In August 2009 the German government set up the Biomass-electricity-sustainability ordinance ("Biomassestrom-Nachhaltigkeitsverordnung", abbreviated "BioSt-NachV"). The background paper written by the Ecologic Institute in October 2009 provides an overview for plant operators who will need to proof their compliance with the new ordinance.Read more

Deforestation and Climate Change: Not for Felling

Deforestation is responsible for roughly one fifth of global carbon emissions, most of it in the tropical forests of the developing world. At the Copenhagen climate talks, negotiators discussed a potential new mechanism to compensate nations for keeping their forests intact. The article by Duncan Brack and Katharina Umpfenbach looks at these REDD proposals (Reducing Emissions from Deforestation and Degradation), arguing that carbon finance alone might not be enough to stop deforestation – unless part of it is spent upfront on improving forest governance.Read more

Sharing the Benefits of Using Traditionally Cultured Genetic Resources Fairly

The sharing of benefits from the use of genetic resources between the traditional users and cultivators of such resources and those that wish to use them for commercial or research purposes is a major issue under the Convention on Biological Diversity (CBD). In this book chapter Christiane Gerstetter of Ecologic Legal develops recommendations for provider countries on how to implement the CBD requirement that benefits should be shared fairly and equitably.Read more

Bringt mehr Umweltschutz mehr Gerechtigkeit?

In the current political debate, justice seems equivalent with even income distribution. Other justice aspects appear absent: studies show that low-income groups suffer more from pollution than high-income groups. This includes noise, air pollution and lack of accessible green spaces. At the same time, higher-income groups consume more resources than the poor. Nils Meyer-Ohlendorf discusses in brief these issues in the MigrantInnenUmweltZeitschrift (MUZ), Issue 2.Read more

Regional Adaptation Strategies for the German Baltic Sea Coast (RADOST)

July 2009 to June 2014
The Ecologic Institute coordinated the five-year project RADOST (Regional Adaptation Strategies for the German Baltic Sea Coast). The Baltic coastline of Mecklenburg-Western Pomerania and Schleswig-Holstein is one of seven model regions in Germany that were supported by the Federal Ministry of Education and Research (BMBF) through the initiative KLIMZUG ("Managing climate change in the regions for the future"). The aim of the RADOST project was to develop regional adaptation strategies in a dialogue between research institutions, business, public administration and civil society.Read more

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