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Biodiversity

showing 411-420 of 501 results

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The Social Dimension of Biodiversity Policy

January 2010 to August 2010
The objective of this project was to characterize the impacts biodiversity loss has or on vulnerable groups in Europe and the developing world and, more specifically, on jobs depending on the use of natural resources from healthy ecosystems. The project used the Millennium Ecosystem Assessment (MEA) framework to describe the link between biodiversity and the provision of ecosystem services in order to generate an understanding of the welfare people attain from such services. The study is available for download.Read more

Cooperation Across the Atlantic for Marine Governance Integration (CALAMAR)

January 2010 to June 2011
As the impacts of climate change and global demand for marine resources have increased, the development of an integrated, holistic marine governance framework has become a key goal for both the EU and US. Recent policy events on both sides of the Atlantic provide a window of opportunity to significantly improve marine governance in national and international waters. To this end, the Ecologic Institute led a transatlantic project team that convened a multi-stakeholder dialogue allowing experts from the EU, US and other regions to develop best practices for integrated marine management.Read more

Arctic Footprint and Policy Assessment

December 2009 to December 2010

The Arctic is often referred to as the bellwether of global climate change. According to the Arctic Climate Impact Assessment and the most recent assessment from IPCC, the warming rate is twice that of the global average, with predictions of further increases leading to substantial loss of Arctic sea ice and large-scale thawing of the permafrost. The Arctic has also been a bellwether for the impact of long-range transboundary air pollution, both regarding human health and how pollutants affect wildlife. Persistent organic pollutants (POPs) and heavy metals (e.g. mercury) are transported long distances through air and water, are deposited in the Arctic and bioaccumulate through the food chain. Some indigenous peoples have a high exposure to these pollutants, primarily through their diet. The goal of this project is to improve the effectiveness of EU environmental policies with respect to the Arctic region.

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Project

Opportunity Costs of EU Biodiversity Action

December 2009 to August 2010

After having missed their target for halting biodiversity loss by 2010, EU policy makers must now rethink their policy actions for protecting biodiversity and ecosystem services as well as the financial resources involved in their implementation. The aim of the project is to produce an estimate of the total economic costs of EU biodiversity policy.

Due to the limited amount of available data on conservation costs, policy makers are currently confronted with difficulties in developing cost-effective policies for the conservation of biodiversity and ecosystems. GivenRead more

Sustainable Development in the European Union – 2009

2009 Monitoring Report of the EU Sustainable Development Strategy
What is the state of sustainable development in the European Union? The 2009 Eurostat monitoring report reviews the progress and implementation of the EU Sustainable Development Strategy. The 2009 monitoring report was published on the Eurostat website.


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Mountain Sustainability: Transforming Research into Practice (mountain.TRIP)

December 2009 to November 2011
Global change holds many risks for European mountain regions. Melting glaciers, changes in permafrost and vegetation, as well as political, economic and cultural globalisation present dangers for mountain populations. Numerous research projects have produced valuable findings to ensure sustainable development in European mountain regions. Mountain.TRIP starts where these projects stop: translating research findings into useful information for practitioners.Read more
Presentation

The Cost of Policy Inaction (COPI) on Biodiversity

TimeLoc
5 November 2009
Frankfurt am Main
Germany

On 5 November 2009, the Biodiversity and Climate Research Centre (BiK-F) in Frankfurt/Main hosted a workshop focusing on “Opportunities and limits of the ecosystem services concept.” Holger Gerdes, Fellow at the Ecologic Institute, gave a presentation on the application of the ecosystem services concept in policy consultancy.

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Biodiversity of Freshwater Ecosystems: Status, Trends, Pressures, and Conservation Priorities (BioFresh)

November 2009 to April 2014

Freshwater biodiversity patterns and the processes that maintain them at European and global scale are poorly understood for most freshwater organisms. The BioFresh FP7 project built a public biodiversity information platform to bring together the vast amount of information on freshwater biodiversity currently scattered among a wide range of databases. This portal allows scientists and planners to evaluate and examine how freshwater biodiversity responds to environmental pressures for more effective conservation planning.

Background

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RADOST – Regional Kick-off Conference

TimeLoc
6 October 2009
Rostock - Warnemünde
Germany
In the context of the conference "Coastal Management & Climate Change: Status Quo" on 5 and 6 October 2009 in Rostock – Warnemünde the RADOST project (Regional Adaptation Strategies for the German Baltic Sea Coast) celebrated its regional kick-off.Read more

Keeping Illegal Fish and Timber off the Market

A Comparison of EU Regulations
Illegal fishing and logging, and the international trade in illegally sourced fish and wood products cause enormous environmental and economic damage. Consumer countries contribute to the problem by importing fish and timber without ensuring legality – a problem the EU tries to address with two new regulations. In this briefing paper, Duncan Brack, Heike Baumüller and Katharina Umpfenbach compare the recently adopted EU regulations on illegal fish and timber products. The authors contrast the very different approaches and highlight areas that might need further strengthening.Read more

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